Economics

653 Posts

Where to Invest in Emerging Markets: Lessons from the Taper Tantrum

Cracking the Emerging Markets Enigma

Emerging market investing offers great potential and yet is not without its risks, as was clearly demonstrated by the “taper tantrum” in 2013–14. So how can investors get the best of both worlds, reaping the benefits while containing the downside? A forthcoming book by Cornell University professor Andrew Karolyi seems to have revealed some of the answers. Read more

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Poll: Is the Oil Price Plunge a Cyclical or Structural Change?

Global oil prices have plunged by approximately 50% over the past seven months, their sharpest price drop since the 2008 global financial crisis. The sudden fall can be attributed to a confluence of factors — most notably, weaker demand because of sluggish economies around the world, a surge in supply because of the shale energy boom in the United States, and a relatively stable geopolitical backdrop (insofar as there have been no meaningful supply disruptions). Read more

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Film Review: Money for Nothing

Film Review: Money for Nothing

The documentary film Money for Nothing: Inside the Federal Reserve is a critical evaluation of the policies pursued by the US Federal Reserve over the years. Released in the United States in 2013 and set amid the context of the global financial crisis, it explores what has become a rather familiar paradox: more debt is both the problem and the solution in pursuing economic growth. Read more

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Weekend Reads for Investors: Greece, Currencies, and Earnings

Weekend Reads for Investors: Greece, Currencies, and Earnings

It’s been an eventful week for most investors, if not a profitable one. In Greece, the leftist Syriza party, which pledged to end austerity, won national elections, and Greek stocks responded by falling 15% over the next three days. Greece’s bailout program expires at the end of February, and their anti-austerity stance and ongoing need for cash sets the stage for a showdown with the so-called “Troika” of the European Union, the European Central Bank (ECB), and the International Monetary Fund (IMF). Expect plenty of political posturing in the coming weeks. Read more

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