Practical analysis for investment professionals

Julie Hammond, CFA

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28 Posts

Biography

Julia Hammond, CFA, is a director in the Educational Events and Programs group at CFA Institute, where she leads the planning for a number of annual and specialty conferences, including the Fixed-Income Management Conference, the Equity Research and Valuation Conference, the Latin America Investment Conference, the Alpha and Gender Diversity Conference, and the Seminar for Global Investors, formerly known as the Financial Analysts Seminar. Previously, she developed strategies for pension, endowment, and foundation fund clients at Equitable Capital Management (now AllianceBernstein), and she has also worked as an auditor for Coopers & Lybrand (now PricewaterhouseCoopers). Hammond served for a number of years as chair of the investment committee for the Rockbridge Regional Library Foundation. She holds a BS in accounting from the McIntire School of Commerce and an MBA from the Darden School at the University of Virginia.

Author's Posts
Gender Diversity in the C-Suite and Boardroom: Blazing a Path

Brenda Trenowden, CFA, and Diane Nordin, CFA, shared firsthand knowledge about corporate board composition and governance, as well as advice on how women in investment management can blaze their own paths to serving on boards.

Forecasting Fixed-Income Default Rates

“Typically when the default rate is 1% or more above the Moody’s forecast, it is a good time to own distressed bonds," Martin Fridson, CFA, said. "Similarly, if the bonds are priced 1% or more below Moody’s, then the distressed bonds are priced too tightly (i.e., a signal to sell).”

Value Stock Picking: Finding “Horses with Legs”

Leah Zell, CFA, discusses her firm's approach to fundamental analysis and why identifying companies with good governance is imperative for managing risks.

Navigating the Fog: Geopolitics and the Global Bond Market

Dan Fuss, CFA, vice chair of Loomis Sayles, has always encouraged analysts and portfolio managers to think broadly about their approach to investment analysis. He provided a global analytical framework through his four Ps — peace (or lack thereof), people, politics, prosperity, and adding perhaps a fifth P for policy and the evolving role of central banks — at the 2015 CFA Institute Fixed-Income Management Conference.

US to Declare Energy Independence by 2017?

To the surprise of most investors, oil prices have been caught in the downward plunge of a treacherous roller-coaster ride recently.

Financial Services Leadership: Demographics and the Glass Ceiling

The pioneering businesswoman Barbara Roberts examined how far women in finance have come in the last 50 years and presented some surprising research about where things may be heading today in her presentation at the recent Women in Investment Management Conference. In particular, she focused on demographic changes, the ongoing pay gap, and the blossoming influence of millennials.

Tracing the Connections between Economic Growth, Capital Markets, and Demography

Robert Arnott, chairman and CEO of Research Affiliates, discusses what demographics can tell us about equity and fixed-income performance in the years ahead.

Specific Risk-Taking Means Doing Your Specific Homework

According to Dan Fuss, CFA, there are always opportunities for those who do their analytical homework. At the CFA Institute Fixed-Income Management conference, he examined some of those opportunities in more detail.

PIMCO’s Seidner: The Economic Recovery Is Even Worse than Many Think

On the surface, people tend to focus on signs of growth in the economy — housing, the manufacturing sector renaissance, and energy independence. And it is true that these longer term trends are improving. But in the here and now, the number of people working has not improved.

Real Energy Independence: Making Oil No Longer “Strategic”

In the United States, there are some big misconceptions among politicians, the media, and the public about reliance on Middle East oil, according to Anne Korin, co-director of the Institute for the Analysis of Global Security. Case in point: Recent oil and natural gas discoveries in North America have led US policymakers to mistakenly think this is the solution to all of our problems — that we will no longer be reliant on imports and oil prices will come down. Unfortunately, this is far from reality; prices will continue to be driven by OPEC unless we change factors first on the demand side.



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