Practical analysis for investment professionals

Larry Cao, CFA

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80 Posts

Biography

Larry Cao, CFA, director of industry research, CFA Institute, conducts original research with a focus on the investment industry trends and investment expertise. His current research interests include multi-asset strategies and FinTech (including AI, big data, and blockchain). He has led the development of such popular publications as FinTech 2017: China, Asia and Beyond, FinTech 2018: The Asia Pacific Edition, and Multi-Asset Strategies: The Future of Investment Management and is a frequent speaker at industry conferences on these topics. During his time in Boston pursuing graduate studies at Harvard and as a visiting scholar at MIT, he also co-authored a research paper with Nobel laureate Franco Modigliani that was published in the Journal of Economic Literature by American Economic Association. Larry has more than 20 years of experience in the investment industry. Prior to joining CFA Institute, Larry worked at HSBC as senior manager for the Asia Pacific region. He started his career at the People’s Bank of China as a USD fixed-income portfolio manager. He also worked for US asset managers Munder Capital Management, managing US and international equity portfolios, and Morningstar/Ibbotson Associates, managing multi-asset investment programs for a global financial institution clientele. Larry has been interviewed by a wide range of business media, such as Bloomberg, CNN, the Financial Times, South China Morning Post and the Wall Street Journal.

Author's Posts
Seven Essential Steps in Portfolio Management

“Even if you are an excellent financial analyst, this alone is insufficient to make you a successful fund manager,” says Dato’ Cheah Cheng Hye, chairman and co-chief investment officer of Value Partners.

Reality Check: What Is India’s New Budget Telling Investors?

Earlier this month, newly elected Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi's administration delivered its first budget. This bears serious attention as the budget is a good indication of the government’s focus and prioritization over the remainder of fiscal 2014 and the entire fiscal 2015.

Weekend Reads for Global Investors: Apple, Asia, and Ackman

It has been an eventful couple of weeks. S&P 500 is marching on to the tune of 2,000. Or should we make that iTunes? Apple reported second quarter results this week, and the iPhone was all the rage, especially in BRIC countries.

Nobel Laureate Robert Engle on High-Frequency Trading and Portfolio Management

In the second part of our interview with Nobel laureate Robert Engle, he discusses the application of ARCH models in high-frequency trading and how he thinks risk models should be applied in portfolio management.

Nobel Laureate Robert Engle on VaR, Systemic Risk, and Liquidity

Nobel laureate Robert Engle discusses the development of the ARCH model, the global financial crisis, systemic risk, and forecasting liquidity with ARCH models.

Emerging Market Debt: An Overlooked Source of Alpha?

After the global financial crisis, emerging market debt was a rising star. Yet, since last fall these markets had steadily lost ground. Now that these markets appear to have stabilized in recent months, are there opportunities for investors? If so, are these opportunities beta or alpha? In other words, can you jump in with both feet or do you have to be selective in what you invest?

What Makes Emerging Market Debt Tick?

Three factors make emerging market debt tick: country risk, mostly driven by fiscal conditions, i.e., internal balances as it is often known; currency risk, driven by balance of payments or external balances and the resulting reserve positions; and corporate credit risk, i.e., company balance sheets.

Investing in China May Just Get Easier

Investors frustrated about not getting access to local shares in China can now relax. Things are about to change for the better.

The Price of Growth: Toxic Smog in China and Elsewhere

Pollution is costing lives, and yet traditional economics and accounting frameworks are not adept at providing a solution.

What Does the Chaori Default Mean for the Chinese Financial Markets?

The Chaori default does not resolve all moral hazard issues in the Chinese financial markets, but it is a step in the right direction.



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