Practical analysis for investment professionals

Hedge Funds


Book Review: Efficiently Inefficient

The author provides a thorough guide to the key trading strategies used by hedge funds and offers an overview of active management. He also explains such diverse approaches as quantitative, macro, dedicated short bias, and many more.

The Golden Age of Hedge Funds

How many of the hedge funds out there are actually worth investing in? Ben Carlson, CFA, explores the question.

Weekend Reads for Investors: Happy New Year Edition

Jason Voss, CFA, shares his curated list of Weekend Reads for Investors. Featured stories explore the fake news epidemic, peer into one of the world's most successful and secretive hedge funds, and estimate the daily operating costs of the Death Star.

Book Review: Hedge Fund Investing

This introduction to hedge funds is also an instructive work of financial history. It discusses hedge funds in relation to other assets and describes specific hedge fund strategies in detail. It also delves into the nitty-gritty of hedge fund operations. Practical rather than theoretical, the book contains worked examples. And a companion website provides practice questions and guideline answers.

Dumb Alpha: How to Build an Above Average Hedge Fund

Joachim Klement, CFA, demonstrates a method for beating average hedge fund returns — without the fees. It's the best dumb alpha can offer: a simple, low-cost investment strategy that outperforms more sophisticated and expensive alternatives.

Book Review: Wall Street Potholes

The author, together with four other expert money managers, addresses a range of investment topics that pose special dangers to investors, including nontrading REITs, yield dependence, structured notes, hedge funds, Wall Street inefficiency, mutual fund fees, annuities, brokers and fiduciaries, and the future for investors.

Does the Buffett Bet Signal the End of Active Management?

Warren Buffett and Protégé Partners entered into a 10-year bet on whether an index fund would outperform a portfolio of hedge funds. With two years remaining, Buffett leads by a wide margin. So what does that mean for the active vs. passive debate?

How NOT to Approach Allocators

We learn best what to do by gaining an understanding of what not to do. Ted Seides, CFA, illustrates that point by highlighting several of the more puzzling solicitations he's received over the years.

Hedge Funds: What Are They Good For?

Hedge fund exposure fails to deliver for investors due to exorbitant fees, high competition, the ineffectiveness of active management, and a general misunderstanding of the underlying exposures and correlations (i.e., hedge funds don’t hedge). But the purpose of hedge funds from the perspective of the manager, parent company, consultants, and brokerages is to collect fees. In that sense, hedge funds have been a huge success each and every year.

Hedge Funds and the Active Management Crisis

It is no secret that active management and hedge funds have underperformed in recent years, but is there a case to be made for them in the long run? When discussing fund performance, the devil is always in the details.



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