Practical analysis for investment professionals

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Weekend Reads: The Eye of the Storm

Predicting the weather or predicting the markets — neither is possible with absolute certainty. This and other musings make up this week's Weekend Reads by Robert Del Mauro.

US Economy: Swimming with the Tide?

Warren Buffett once said, “You only find out who is swimming naked when the tide goes out.” Could the tide be receding for the US economy? Ron Rimkus, CFA, explores the question.

Edward Altman: The Benign Credit Cycle Is in Extra Innings

Edward Altman says the benign credit cycle is in “extra innings,” but the metaphorical relief pitchers — central bankers — are running out of gas. Though most indicators point towards the end of the benign cycle, Altman cannot predict when the stress cycle will begin.

The Outlook for Fixed Income: Stagnant Prices, Tighter Money

Interest rates are nearing a lower bound, David Schawel, CFA, tells Will Ortel during a recent Take 15 interview. “Most likely we’re not going to be in a 30-year bull market for interest rates falling again,” he said. So what does this mean for fixed-income investors?

Helicopter Money: An Idea Whose Time Has Come?

What's the cause of the current global economic malaise? Lord Adair Turner believes it all comes down to debt. His proposed solution? Helicopter money, or what he prefers to call "overt monetary finance of increased fiscal expenditure."

Weekend Reads: Social Entrepreneurs, Bond Investing, and Human Nature

In my previous life, as a reporter for the Financial Times, I did a stint covering philanthropy. I heard a lot about social entrepreneurship, philanthrocapitalism, and the ways that some philanthropists and nonprofit organizations were tackling some of the world's toughest, seemingly intractable, social ills.

How Will the Next Decade Change Markets?

As the saying goes, it’s tough to make predictions, especially about the future. But it’s manifestly worth the effort because catching big trends is how fortunes are made and catastrophic losses are avoided.

Has Global Debt Become Unsustainable?

During the global financial crisis, excessive debt was the principal disease. It also turned out to be the principal cure. Whether it was called quantitative easing (QE) or something else, it all meant the same thing: increased debt — both in absolute terms and relative to GDP.

Exit of Argentina’s President Offers Value Opportunity

It is difficult to imagine that Argentina will not prove an attractive investment after a change in government.

Debt: What’s Wrong With It? (Video)

Economist Paul Mills questions the conventional wisdom on debt while discussing rising debt levels and if the levels are sustainable.



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