Practical analysis for investment professionals

History & Geopolitics


Investing in U.S. Financial History: Three Principles, Three Excerpts

The "Paradox of Speculation" -- how securities speculation drives both pain and progress -- is among the key lessons of financial history.

Mike Tang, CFA, CPA, on Spin-Off Listings in Hong Kong SAR

What's the appeal of spin-offs in general and in Mainland China and Hong Kong SAR, in particular? KPMG partner Mike Tang, CFA, CPA, shares his insights.

The Unspoken Conflict of Interest at the Heart of Investment Consulting

While investment consultants may claim their advice is conflict-free — and their clients may believe them — it is often heavily biased by the investment consultants' own self-interest.

Decoupling Correlations: Global Markets since COVID-19

An examination of global stock market indices since 2015 reveals one clear takeaway: Every single index's average correlation with all other indices has fallen.

US Cannabis Investing: An Overview

The cannabis industry constitutes a new frontier in investing and is ripe with growth opportunities.

Book Review: Investing in U.S. Financial History 

Mark J. Higgins, CFA, CFP's epic book offers invaluable context for forecasting the direction of the economy and the market.

Top 10 Posts from 2023: The 10 Greatest Investors, ChatGPT, and the Active Management Delusion

Enterprising Investor's most popular posts of the year include contributions from Mark J. Higgins, CFA, CFP, Larry Cao, CFA, Michinori Kanokogi, CFA, and Yoshimasa Satoh, CFA, among others.

The Weakening US Consumer

The United States is a consumption-driven economy. But over the last half century, the US consumer has been weakening in the face of social and economic pressures.

Markets in Chaos: A Return to the Gold Standard?

The grand monetary experiment of the last decade and a half has undermined the global financial system and necessitates a radical solution.

Book Review: The Paradox of Debt

Dick Cheney said that “Reagan proved that deficits don’t matter.” Richard Vague suspects that Cheney may well have been right.