Practical analysis for investment professionals

central banking


Top Five Articles from August: Growth vs. Value, Blockchain, Tax-Loss Harvesting

In August's leading posts, Larry Cao, CFA, receives a blockchain update, Julie Hammond, CFA, considers the state of fixed income, and Clare Flynn Levy shares tips for succeeding as a portfolio manager.

Watch the Leverage!

“We’re transitioning into a very delicate and challenging time for fixed-income investing,” Anne Walsh, CFA, told the audience at the 63rd Annual Financial Analysts Seminar.

Top Five Articles from January: India, ETFs, and Vollgeld

What were the leading stories from Enterprising Investor in January?

The Vollgeld Initiative: A Primer

Switzerland will vote on a measure to end fractional reserve banking in 2018. Known as the Vollgeld, or "Full Money," Initiative, this proposal could transform modern finance as we know it. Jason Voss, CFA, curates a helpful reading list.

US Economy: Swimming with the Tide?

Warren Buffett once said, “You only find out who is swimming naked when the tide goes out.” Could the tide be receding for the US economy? Ron Rimkus, CFA, explores the question.

The Mad Scientists of Monetary Policy

Like modern-day Drs. Frankenstein, central bankers are trying to artificially create life in the financial system. They have embraced extraordinary monetary policies to create economic growth where none would exist. And someday soon, the monsters they are experimenting with may wake up and break out, Ron Rimkus, CFA, explains.

Bearish on a Bull Market: Central Banks and the S&P 500

What explains the recent surge in the S&P 500 index? We asked CFA Institute Financial NewsBrief readers what they thought was responsible for the strong performance.

James Grant: Negative Interest Rates Will End — Badly

“Radical monetary policy begets more radical policy,” says James Grant. “It seems to me at some point markets or voters will put a stop to this.”

Weekend Reads: The Troll Economy in Seven Charts

There are plenty of risks to be mindful of given the current state of the markets. But a US recession is not one of them, says Will Ortel.

Has Global Debt Become Unsustainable?

During the global financial crisis, excessive debt was the principal disease. It also turned out to be the principal cure. Whether it was called quantitative easing (QE) or something else, it all meant the same thing: increased debt — both in absolute terms and relative to GDP.



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